Protecting the Shoreline

Tahoe’s shoreline beauty is deteriorating rapidly in some areas. Algae blooms, sediment, water weeds, and non-native clams are big problems. The shoreline ecosystem is rapidly changing. Trash and graffiti mar beaches and boulder areas. League programs that help protect Tahoe’s shoreline include:

The League is a member of the technical advisory committee of the newly revamped Regional Stormwater Monitoring Program, which aims to streamline stormwater monitoring, organize the
vast amounts of data...

The League hosts beach cleanups throughout the summer as well as every September in honor of the national Coastal Cleanup Day, which has been a huge success year after year. Lake Tahoe’s beaches need attention...

The League is spending substantial staff time ironing out a comprehensive program to regulate boats and related development on the lake. The League has been working with the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, Sierra Club...

Pipe Keepers is a volunteer-based pipe outflow monitoring program. The program examines pollution levels in water being released from storm drains throughout Tahoe's shoreline and its tributaries to see which are the most polluting.

Eyes on the Lake is the League's volunteer program to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive plants in Tahoe's waters. If you are a water lover in Tahoe (SCUBA diver, paddler, swimmer, beachgoer, or boater) and...

Tahoe's shoreline beauty is deteriorating rapidly in some areas. We often see algae blooms, water weeds, non-native Asian clams and silt along the shoreline. These are signs that the shoreline ecosystem is rapidly changing...

Regular beach cleanup is one of the easiest ways to help our most valuable resource. Debris on the beaches and streets can easily find its way to the lake and adversely impact lake clarity, water quality, and native plants and wildlife. Public participation in beach cleanups is part of basin-wide environmental stewardship initiatives.
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